Sixth Form Iceland Trip, 4th-7th April 2016

During the Easter break, 25 sixth form students travelled to Iceland to complement their A level geography studies. It was a jam-packed four days, with many miles covered and many stunning features covered. Having landed on Monday afternoon, we travelled straight the ‘Bridge of Continents’, a simple bridge over a small gap which represents the plate boundary between the North American and the Eurasian plates. At one point, half of the group was in America and half in Europe! This, along with many other locations during the trip brought to life the monumental seismic forces acting on our planet. Another favourite visit on day one was the geothermal pool of the Blue Lagoon, where we were able to bathe in lovely geothermal heat even though the outside temperature was 5 degrees.

Days two and three were equally as busy, with visits to stunning waterfalls, natural geysers and Thingvellir (another site along the plate boundary and where the country of Iceland was declared). There were also basalt columns and amazing stacks and arches along the South Coast and a visit to the most recent and highly disruptive volcano in 2010, Eyjafjallajökull. Over half of the group could pronounce this correctly by the end of the trip! The final day involved a visit to some extremely smelly but quite stunning bubbling mud puddles and a whistle stop tour around Reykjavik.

When asked on the journey home, the students struggled to identify just one highlight from the trip, there is really nowhere more interesting or exciting for a geographer!

 

 

 

 

 

Sixth Form Iceland Trip, 4th-7th April 2016

During the Easter break, 25 sixth form students travelled to Iceland to complement their A level geography studies. It was a jam-packed four days, with many miles covered and many stunning features covered. Having landed on Monday afternoon, we travelled straight the ‘Bridge of Continents’, a simple bridge over a small gap which represents the plate boundary between the North American and the Eurasian plates. At one point, half of the group was in America and half in Europe! This, along with many other locations during the trip brought to life the monumental seismic forces acting on our planet. Another favourite visit on day one was the geothermal pool of the Blue Lagoon, where we were able to bathe in lovely geothermal heat even though the outside temperature was 5 degrees.

Days two and three were equally as busy, with visits to stunning waterfalls, natural geysers and Thingvellir (another site along the plate boundary and where the country of Iceland was declared). There were also basalt columns and amazing stacks and arches along the South Coast and a visit to the most recent and highly disruptive volcano in 2010, Eyjafjallajökull. Over half of the group could pronounce this correctly by the end of the trip! The final day involved a visit to some extremely smelly but quite stunning bubbling mud puddles and a whistle stop tour around Reykjavik.

When asked on the journey home, the students struggled to identify just one highlight from the trip, there is really nowhere more interesting or exciting for a geographer!